Welcome
Login / Register

Health


  • Why women need more sleep than men.

    Women need more sleep than men, according to a recent study. Researchers from Duke University have discovered that, compared to men, women experience more mental and physical consequences from inadequate rest. Besides giving half the population a legitimate reason to sleep in, the findings could also inspire new health recommendations for women at greater risk of heart disease, depression, and psychological problems.

    The study, which was led by clinical psychologist and sleep expert Michael Breus, estimated men and women’s respective needs for sleep by assessing their ability to deal with insufficient rest. According to Breus, the experiment suggested a sharp difference between genders. "We found that women had more depression, women had more anger, and women had more hostility early in the morning," he told reporters.

    WHO NEEDS HOW MUCH?


    Many biological factors are thought to contribute to this disparity. However, some experts believe that it ultimately comes down to mental energy expenditure. Women, they say, simply use their brain more than men do.

    "One of the major functions of sleep is to allow the brain to recover and repair itself. During deep sleep, the cortex — the part of the brain responsible for thought, memory, language and so on — disengages from the senses and goes into recovery mode,” Jim Horne, director of the Sleep Research Center at Loughborough University in England, told The Australian. "The more of your brain you use during the day, the more of it that needs to recover and, consequently, the more sleep you need. Women tend to multi-task — they do lots at once and are flexible — and so they use more of their actual brain than men do.”

    It follows that, if men used their brains more during the day, they would need a couple of extra hours too. "A man who has a complex job that involves a lot of decision-making and lateral thinking may also need more sleep than the average male — though probably still not as much as a woman,” Horne said.

    THE SCIENCE OF SLEEP


    Breus’ and his colleagues’ study adds to a growing number of scientific inquiries into the health outcomes of sleep deprivation. In a paper published earlier this year, researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine showed a correlation between inadequate rest and accelerated skin aging. Other studies have linked poor sleeping patterns to an elevated risk of heart disease, blood clots, stroke, and psychiatric problems.

    The average American adult requires between 7 and 9 hours of sleep every day. That said, 80 percent of the population say they habitually fall short of this quota. To learn more about sleep and improving rest patterns, visit The National Sleep Foundation’s online resources.

    Read more »
  • PEEING AFTER DOING IT TO PREVENT PREGNANCY?

    A friend of mine was horrified last week when her 14 year-old niece told her that peeing after sex could prevent pregnancy. They argued for a bit until her niece triumphantly said that she had proof because she has been peeing after unprotected sex with her boyfriend for months and she isn’t pregnant. So there!

    The niece was promptly marched off to the doctor for a firm conversation about sex, contraception and safety, but wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could just write that off as one spectacularly misinformed kid? Don’t you wish we could confidently tell ourselves that most 14 year-olds aren’t sexually active and even if they were, they would know more than my friend’s niece?

    Well we can’t. I’ve known my friend’s niece for years. She’s at a good school, has loving (if very conservative) parents and should know better.

    That she didn’t is not nearly as unusual as we might think.

    About one quarter of kids in year 10 are sexually active, by the time they reach year 12 that figure doubles. Less than half of those kids are using condoms. More than half are sexually active for at least a year before they visit a doctor to talk about contraception. I could fill several pages with terrifying statistics, but I think you probably get the general idea: teenagers are having sex and they are not doing it safely.

    Catherine Manning is the CEO of Melbourne’s SEED (Self-Esteem,Education and Development), and regularly facilitates workshops with teenagers on sexuality and consent. She was saddened but not shocked when I recounted my friend’s conversation with her niece. She told me that she has often heard such claims from young teenagers.

    “Kids don’t have the level of understanding about sex and sexuality that we imagine they do. Schools and parents seem to think that teenagers are much more aware of this stuff than they actually are, that they can find it on the internet and don’t need to have those conversations with adults. It’s simply not true. The information is certainly there, and sites like Birdee are great resource, but kids don’t go looking for the information until something goes wrong. By then the horse has bolted. Schools are teaching the mechanics, or at least they’re supposed to, but clearly the message isn’t getting through to everyone.”

    School curriculums vary across all the states and territories in Australia, but most schools are supposed to at least teach the basics about sex. Parental consent is required in some states, which presents the horrifying possibility that the kids least likely to receive sex-ed at home are prevented from learning about it at school.

    But, as my friend and Catherine Manning found out, even the kids who are present in sex-ed classes are not learning even the most basic information, let alone the more complex stuff about consent, respect, enjoyment and protection from disease.

    I’ve had those awkward conversations with my own kids (the one that really stands out is my nine year-old asking me what oral sex was. I told her and she didn’t believe me; we’re both still scarred by that conversation).

    I’m fairly confident they understand how it all works, but I probably need to go back and check. Because I’m also guilty of complacency. I mean, I’m knowledgeable, articulate and write regularly about feminist issues, so of course my kids know all that stuff, right?

    But now I think about it, we haven’t talked a lot about it over the last few years. What have they been told by their friends since then? How much of what I told them do they remember? How much do they think I got wrong? How much of the stuff that is really important did they dismiss as things that don’t matter?

    And the most frightening questions of all: Are they doing something that could endanger them because they don’t know all the things they should know?

    And will they tell me about it if they are?

    Read more »
  • Learn About Your Health Risk through Your Blood Group!

    Blood are significant and also very vital when it comes to understanding your health state. There are four blood types: A, B, AB, and O and two Rh factors-plus and minus. Every one of us inherit our blood type and the Rh factor from our parents. Over the years, there have been research on the importance of blood types for the complete health care, in this day and age we have been empowered to know how some blood types are related to diseases.
    For example, women with blood type A are more fertile, but prone to stomach cancer. Hence, people with blood type O have smaller chances for heart attacks; however, they can experience problems with high blood pressure whereas individuals with blood type B have an increased risk of pancreatic cancer.
    Women with blood type A are more fertile because as the time passes and they age, they lose fewer egg cells.

    Tip: Eating bananas can decrease the chances for development of cancer cells.

    People with blood type B have an increased possibility for ulcers, but a good metabolism. Moreover, they can have weaker memory or develop dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in older age. They are also more prone to developing pancreatic cancer. Generally speaking, individuals with blood type B can build up muscles easier.


    Blood are significant and also very vital when it comes to understanding your health state. There are four blood types: A, B, AB, and O and two Rh factors-plus and minus. Every one of us inherit our blood type and the Rh factor from our parents. Over the years, there have been research on the importance of blood types for the complete health care, in this day and age we have been empowered to know how some blood types are related to diseases.
    For example, women with blood type A are more fertile, but prone to stomach cancer. Hence, people with blood type O have smaller chances for heart attacks; however, they can experience problems with high blood pressure whereas individuals with blood type B have an increased risk of pancreatic cancer.
    Women with blood type A are more fertile because as the time passes and they age, they lose fewer egg cells.

    Tip: Eating bananas can decrease the chances for development of cancer cells.

    People with blood type B have an increased possibility for ulcers, but a good metabolism. Moreover, they can have weaker memory or develop dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in older age. They are also more prone to developing pancreatic cancer. Generally speaking, individuals with blood type B can build up muscles easier.

    People with blood type O have a lower risk of heart attacks and stomach cancer; however, they have an increased risk of developing stomach ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori.
    Males with this blood type can suffer from obesity, whereas females can have poorer eggs quality and fertility problems. Hence, people with blood type O are more immune to stress as the stress level of the hormone Cortisol lowers quicker.
    Women with AB blood type have higher chances of developing ovarian cancers, while pregnant women can develop high blood pressure. People with this blood type are more prone to strokes, heart diseases, and digestive problems like chronic gastritis, Crohn’s disease, etc. However, they are very resistant to stress.

    Read more »
RSS